Perseid Collapse Kindle Worlds Novellas

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This world keeps growing. That is, Author Steven Konkoly’s Perseid Collapse Kindle Worlds is now 15 authors strong. Many of the novellas like The Amsterdam Directorate and The Pilgrimage by Tom Abrahams are in a series. With the additional books the total comes to eighteen novellas so far and there are more scheduled to be released. I know when I joined the ranks of the Perseid Collapse Kindle Worlds with Deception on Durham Road, I had no idea they would be so popular.  It was an honor to write in someone else’s worlds and I hope to go back to my contribution and extend it into another novella.

So if you’re looking for a short read and you’ve read Steven Konkoly’s Perseid Collapse series, give these Kindle Worlds a try. It’s a great way to discover a new author or two. I’ve read many of them and they are all quite impressive.

Author Introduction – Tim Queeney

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Meet Author, Tim Queeney. Tim is another author of The Perseid Collapse Series. He wrote The Borealis Incident and let me tell you, it’s a fast paced novella with a few twists and turns I didn’t expect.

We also collaborated on a blog post recently about leading women in fiction of the Perseid Collapse novellas. The post has been reposted several times. I think we both hit a niche that has taken too long to come to fruition. Leading roles for women are only a recent discovery. I hope this trend keeps up. We women have a lot to offer the world and the plausibility of such a role in today’s society has taken too long to catch up.

Back to The Borealis Incident… Here’s the description. I read it in one sitting and loved Tim’s voice throughout the novel. I think he did a great job.

Lt. Colonel Dana Wright has barely started as deputy commander of Thule Air Force Base in remote northern Greenland when a fireball in the sky changes everything. Fighting massive fires kicked off by the flaming meteorites, losing communications with the U.S. and having civilian contractors abandon the base are just the beginning of her challenges. Soon Dana and the embattled Air Force personnel are facing off against the belligerent commander of nearby Camp Amarok, a mysterious Arctic facility claiming to conduct ice cap research but whose true mission has remained a closely guarded secret. And Dana’s worries don’t stop there, her photographer husband, on a Greenland photo shoot accompanied by their 12-year-old daughter, has disappeared and Dana doesn’t have the people, helicopters or time to search for them. When the Amarok commander demands that Dana turn over the base’s only C-130 to fly his team out, it sets off a confrontation that reveals what’s behind Amarok’s closed doors and pushes Dana to the limit.

Tim Queeney is author to several other novels. His latest release is The Ceres Plauge, below. He’s also a magazine editor. You can read more about Tim at his website here.

 

Resourceful Women in the Perseid Collapse Series

 Joint Post BY Tim Queeney & A. R. Shaw · MARCH 17, 2015

Steve Konkoly’s The Perseid Collapse Kindle World launched in February 2015 with nine novellas. Two of those original Perseid Screen-Shot-2015-02-03-at-11.15.06-PM-199x300Collapse novellas had female lead characters: The Borealis Incident by Tim Queeney and Deception on Durham Road by A.R. Shaw. In this joint blog post, A.R. Shaw and I talk about those female characters and how they fit in The Perseid Collapse world and the even right here in the real world. 

The Borealis Incident Tim Queeney: Going back even just a few decades, it’s hard to imagine a female deputy commander of a U. S. Air Force Base. Yet today, writing a woman lead character like Lt. Colonel Dana Wright in my Perseid Collapse novella, The Borealis Incident, is not something that requires a great leap of faith from readers. Woman have made huge strides in the military, with female pilots and ship drivers not an unusual occurrence. The biggest issue Dana has to face in Borealis is that the base security officer doesn’t want her driving alone to the missile warning radar site 13 miles across the Greenland tundra from the base itself. Perhaps he’s concerned because Dana is a woman, but maybe he’d be just as uneasy with the practice if the deputy commander was a man.

A.R. Shaw’s Deception on Durham Road also has a female lead, Jamie Michaud. But instead of a military officer, Jaime is a mom working to protect her two daughters. Jamie represents a modern example of a classic American archetype: the pioneer woman and mother. The woman who headed west in the early Nineteenth Century were not reclining on plush seats in the back of their Conestoga wagons, they were busy from sunup to sundown with a wearying variety of domestic duties, plus the need at times to help defend the wagon train. The pioneer woman were smart and tough and Jamie displays plenty of those qualities, too.

Screen Shot 2015-03-16 at 11.43.53 PMA.R. Shaw: I agree with Author, Tim Queeney, twenty five years ago, when I served in the Air Force Reserves, it wasn’t unusual to have women performing important jobs in the military, but as a base commander? No question that’s one position only few have recently obtained. The question now may be, are women capable of such lead roles in society and in fiction?

Of course, I’m biased. I am a woman. I served in the military. I run a household. I’m a mother and a wife. And, I’m my own boss. Those are all acceptable roles in reality but in fiction only recently has it become ‘plausible’ for a woman to command a military base. To be the CEO of large corporations or to become president of the United States. (Actually, that hasn’t happened yet. I’m sure we’re waiting for the right candidate.)

I know some of us are capable of leading the way. Not every man has what it takes and the same goes for woman. In Tim Queeney’s Borealis Incident, the lead role is held by Dana Wright. She’s earned her right to be at the top through hard work and determination. You accept this role as a reader now because it’s happened in reality, it’s plausible.

In my novella, Deception on Durham Road, Jamie is a French teacher by trade and a mother of two teen girls. Nothing unusual there. She’s made mistakes in life by trying to replace the deceased father by an unworthy fellow. What makes her exceptional is her acceptance to overcome abuse and her fight to make it on her own, not only for herself but for her daughters too. She’s not running off for help from a FEMA camp. She’s not begging for food from strangers. She’s taking charge of her life and her responsibilities. This too happens in reality. Her courage is plausible and we see it from time to time, it’s impressive but it’s not the norm. The norm is applying for state aid or to depend on others to help you.

In both of these novellas, you see an inner strength, a will to fight and a steadfast resolve for a lead female character.

Get Deception on Durham Road

Get The Borealis Incident