Surrender The Sun is now on PreSale!

Facebook Post (1)

 

Surrender the Sun is now on PreSale!

What a crazy week! First, I released The French Wardrobe and then released Surrender the Sun as a Presale on Amazon.

Here is the description.

It’s happened once before, and it will happen again.

In the year 2030 the Maunder Minimum, a period of solar inactivity, will cause a mini-ice age like it did between the years 1645 and 1710. When it does, Bishop will have to save her not only from the effects of severe weather but also from man himself.

Maeve Tilton and her son Ben live alone in the rural town of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Since her husband died in the war, she’s barely kept her head above water, and when the first freeze strikes in the fall, she’s completely unprepared for what lies ahead. Only a war-torn man, one who prefers the solitude of the Kootenai National Forest, can rescue her and her son.

 

I’m really excited about this new release. The concept of the Maunder Minimum is frightening and the more I research the more I scare myself. LOL.

Surrender The Sun takes place in a location I know very well, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. I went there last winter and did a little poking around during a snowstorm. It’s a beautiful part of the country and if you ever get a chance to visit, please do. You’ll never forget it. Maybe not in the winter…it’s a summer retreat. The background picture from above is one that I took off of a high ledge. There’s a lot of camping and hiking, fishing and boating to do.

But, Surrender the Sun changes all of that. A mini ice age that changes the world. When I say mini, I mean fifty years or so. That’s how long the last one lasted and that’s what some scientist are predicting to happen again around 2030.

I like the idea of taking real world threats and using them to create a catastrophe around. The realism catches reader’s attention and makes them think of the possibilities. I certainly hope there never is a mass plague as in Graham’s Resolution or a mini ice age in our future but the thought of such conditions makes us wonder how we could survive them. That’s a good thing in my view.